Sunshine State Rain-outs


According to statistics gathered by the BBB’s meteorological and statistical departments, 10.9% of Florida State League contests since the beginning of the 2012 season have been postponed or canceled due to rain.  In a joint effort by the cloud crowd and the number lumpers, the BBB gathered, filtered, and sensually massaged game schedule data from each of the FSL’s team websites (example).  The tables below show a wide variation among the teams, with the Clearwater Threshers experiencing only four rain-outs at home from opening day 2012 through August 1st, 2013, but the Lakeland Tigers suffering thirty-six during the same time period.


2012

2013

The word “meeting”, as used above, represents either a normal uninterrupted game; or a game started but suspended until another day due to rain; or the resumption of a game suspended by rain on a previous day; or games postponed or canceled due to rain.  The total number of meetings represented in the charts above is 1633.  The total number of rain-outs is 178.  That’s a league-wide rain-out percentage of 10.9.


Postponements and cancellations due to “inclement weather” or “wet grounds” were counted as rain also.


Most of us view rain-outs as merely an infrequent annoyance, but at a rate of nearly 11%, their impact is probably much greater than we think.  Does Lakeland have a hidden advantage over its FSL competition because of its high rain-out rate?  Do their relief pitchers get extra rest days that relievers of other teams do not enjoy?  Or do they suffer a disadvantage because postponed games are frequently made up with double-headers, which force their position players to play twice in the same day?  Does this increase potential for injury?  Speaking of double-header games, they’re usually truncated to seven innings each, which reduces a player’s overall time spent playing ball.  Do scouts suffer from this reduced exposure to the players they’re watching, and are their player evaluations adversely affected by long double-header days spent watching fourteen innings in hot, humid weather?


If you’re the general manager of a major league club, do you consider the frequency of rain-outs and its effect on pitcher rotations?  Do you really want your top prospect getting all warmed-up, just to have his start rained-out?  For a team like Lakeland, with close to a quarter of its home meetings rained out, that’s a real concern, especially for the younger pitchers of high-A baseball who may not have learned yet how their bodies will react to such adverse start-and-stop physical demands.


We at the BBB find this topic very interesting, and may attempt to answer a question or two listed above in future posts.  Stay tuned.

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Hark! The Herald Hornblowers Blow

Angel Choir

When important things happen it is imperative that we celebrate with the blowing of horns.  The Herald Angels knew this, as do the self-assured retirees at Florida Auto Exchange Stadium in Dunedin.

Who amongst us has not yearned to bellow thusly?  This is not simply the unmodulated cacophony of fools and dumb children, as it was that horrible night in Miami when the Marlins handed out free vuvuzelas.  This is strategic!  So let the denizens of that far dugout hear the grey lions roar!  Then, as conquerors, we shall return to the somewhat old yet virtuous women of the Sunset Village Retirement Community and we shall bruise in them the serpent’s head, joining Thine to ours, and ours to Thine, as the randy hymnal suggests all good Christians do.

Brett Lawrie Needs to Adjust Himself

When Major Leaguers are rehabilitating from injury, they frequently play a few games for their franchise’s Minor League affiliate just before returning to the Bigs.  Such was the case for Toronto Blue Jays third baseman Brett Lawrie during a recent Florida State League Division Championship game at Florida Auto Exchange Stadium in Dunedin.  Now, a while back over at Tropicana Field, the BBB scouting department had previously entered into their Atari Portfolio PDA that Brett Lawrie is a fidgety sort, fussing and twitching and adjusting himself throughout the entirety of his defensive outings.  So, we were primed to notice his behavior at this Minor League game, where we moved in to capture some close-up video and synchronize it to horns and whistles for your giggly entertainment.


Thank you for watching.  You may now return to your Taco Bell entrée and Jerry Bruckheimer production.

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